The World War II Unit That Fought Barefoot and Was Vital to Allied Victory

barefoot World War II unit
Via Pixabay

As global conflict raged on, many heroes emerged in the 1940s. One World War II unit you may not have heard about has a very unique story. Pago Pago, on Tutuila, was a small but important base in the Samoa Islands vital to maintaining communications between the United States, Australia, and New Zealand.

While the base was manned by U.S Navy and Marines, they relied on the help of Samoan locals. Working closely with the 7th Marines to fortify the garrison, these brave men were essential to success.

According to records from the National Park Service, these American nationals helped defend 52 square miles of treacherous terrain. Furthermore, the 1st Samoan Battalion, Marine Corps Reserve, founded in 1941, did this without wearing shoes.

The barefoot battalion is certainly an interesting part of history. There is much more to the story, however, and you can read more about this unique World War II unit here.

We honor and celebrate all who gave so much during World War II and Korea. Without the sacrifices of our heroes, the world would not be what it is today. That is why we support The Greatest Generation Benefits Act. Learn how this helps those who lived through WWII and Korea here.